The Start Of Everything.

By Anthony Thomas

When I started this whole ARB Foundation I was at the lowest point in my life, and wow never did I ever think that this foundation would be this big in such a short period of time as it is right now.

The beginning.

So like I said earlier…

  I was suffering from depression really bad. My depression stemmed from me losing someone I truly loved. Ali Renee Brown, I can go on and on about how much I love her and how she and Karson was and is still my world, but you guys already know that.
When I started 
The ARB Foundation was my way of keeping Ali heart alive…….. All she ever wanted to do was to help those in need, Ali heart was so big she wanted to help those suffering from depression and addictions. Ali was strong she battled her depression, and her addiction every day, and always maintained a smile on your face even if it was just to put on the front. She lived her life to the fullest.

Ali would often tell me about her group meetings and how she felt close and connected with all the people there in some way. Maybe because they were all going the the same situation.

I will never forget the day she came over to my house after her group meeting and all she talked about was how she wanted to help those struggling with depression and addiction just like her, an in that moment I could see it in her eyes that she found her calling in life, and that’s what she wanted to do. Ali wanted to help young women like herself to defeat their demons and to Rise up against depression and drug addiction….. From that moment I knew I wanted to help her achieve her dream. 

 
On January 12th 2017 we lost Ali, Not to her depression, or to her addiction. On the 13th of January, my birthday I found out that I had lost the one person I ever truly cared about in this life beside her baby boy Karson. That’s when my life became worthless, I felt empty, I felt like i lose a part of my soul, and that when my depression kicked in. I was lost, I couldn’t eat, I couldn’t sleep, i didn’t leave my house until her funeral!! By that time I’d had lost a lot of weight I was so angry with myself,  I didn’t know how the face her family.

I truly hated the world… I hated myself for not being there with her in her time of need to protect her. Man I felt so low and empty I miss you. And I hate that I miss you, because I shouldn’t have to. We should have been plan our life together…. I should be able to call you up. I should be able to see you face them big blue eyes anymore, and knowing that was the worst feeling ever. 
 Feeling that way really made my depression even worst.  

But one day that all changed when Ali came to me in a dream, and she told me that she was happy and free of this world and that her legacy would always live on with her son, her family and with me! She told me that I had the opportunity to help those in need those who are battling with depression and addiction just like she did that I had the opportunity to help them and to have her legacy live on forever…….. With the ARB Foundation. 

Then I woke up!! True story……. I will never forget that dream. I know that Ali know that I was at my lowest point, and that she had to motivate me, she had to pick me up, because she knew that the depression was keeping me down. So she challenged me to make a difference, to take the dream she had to help those with the same situation as her, and to help them become their greatest version. 

So that’s when I knew what I had to do, so I told the ones closest to me that I was starting up a nonprofit in Ali honor. I asked her Parents if It was okay if could name my nonprofit organization after Ali, they give me the okay and their love and support and the rest is history. 

 We started ARB Foundation officially about 5 months ago and I can’t express how grateful I am for all the love and support we have accumulated in such a short time. I am forever grateful to all the people who have supported me, from the start people like Emma Bartshe, Rhonda Dean, Trent Brown, Kendall Foreman, Liz Bentley, etc…… Because without you guys, and Ali, and Karson, none of this wouldn’t be possible. 

Thank you…… Ali Renee Brown, for changing mylife forever. 

Depressed? Well Here Is Some Motivation.

For those who need a heavy dose of motivation, are under the influence of a void or a ‘life trough’ and need some persuasion to get up and fight!

That’s the thing about depression: A human being can survive almost anything, as long as she sees the end in sight. But depression is so insidious, and it compounds daily, that it’s impossible to ever see the end.
That why we must fight….. 

If you know someone who’s depressed, please resolve never to ask them why. Depression isn’t a straightforward response to a bad situation; depression just is, like the weather.
Try to understand the blackness, lethargy, hopelessness, and loneliness they’re going through. Be there for them when they come through the other side. It’s hard to be a friend to someone who’s depressed, but it is one of the kindest, noblest, and best things you will ever do.
Be there for them show them you love them.

Listen to other people’s stories on how to cope with depression……. An take it one day at a time. 

Remember 

If You Know Someone in Crisis

Call the toll-free National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (NSPL) at 1-800-273-TALK (8255), 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. The service is available to everyone. The deaf and hard of hearing can contact the Lifeline via TTY at 1-800-799-4889. All calls are confidential. Contact social media outlets directly if you are concerned about a friend’s social media updates or dial 911 in an emergency.

In Response to 13 Reasons Why

By Jamie Tworkowski

This blog is Original from TWLOHA.com

Right now, thousands of people are talking about the show 13 Reasons Why. We’ve heard stories of people asking for help for the first time, and stories of people who had to stop watching because the show was too triggering for them. We’ve heard from parents asking if we think the show is appropriate for their son or daughter. We’ve heard from people who loved the show, and we’ve heard from people who hated it.

13 Reasons Why is causing a significant number of individuals to think and talk about mental health, and many of them are thinking and talking about it for the first time. That’s a good thing. The show is also being met with criticism because of the way it portrays sexual assault and suicide. The show is triggering and painful for a lot of people. That’s a bad thing.

If you struggle or have struggled with self-injury or thoughts of suicide, we would encourage you NOT to watch 13 Reasons Why. We’ve heard from many people who have chosen to avoid the show, and we applaud these folks who are choosing to prioritize their own recovery. We know this is a unique moment in pop culture, with so many people talking about 13 Reasons Why. You are certainly more important than pop culture, and we will always encourage you to put your recovery first.

We’ve heard from people who started watching but then at some point they had to stop because it was too painful. Others watched every episode but it left them with mixed feelings. If your heart is heavy after watching 13 Reasons Why, we’re sorry for the pain you experienced. Our hope would be that you have safe people who you can process your feelings with. Maybe that means friends as a place to start. Maybe it means a parent or another adult you can be open and honest with. If you’re struggling to the point that you need more support than what a friend or family member can provide, please know that it’s okay to reach out to a mental health professional.

Speaking of mental health professionals, we know that the show doesn’t paint the best picture of counseling. The school counselor, who is not a licensed mental health counselor, certainly fumbles his meeting with Hannah in the final episode. Well, at TWLOHA, we are huge fans of counseling. Most of our team, we’ve either been to counseling or we continue to go to counseling. We know some great ones, men and women who have devoted a big part of their lives to helping people navigate the hardest parts of their stories. We believe that for folks who are struggling, connecting with a licensed mental health counselor can be the decision that changes their life. We meet people who say they’re still alive because they decided to start seeing a counselor.

If you’re a parent who is concerned about how to talk to your son or daughter, our advice would be to talk to them. If you don’t know what to say, maybe you start there. It’s important that your child knows you love them, that they know they’re not alone, and that they feel invited to speak openly and honestly about their feelings and their pain. As for you, the parent, it’s okay for you to ask questions. It’s okay to admit what you don’t know. It’s also important to create an environment where family members feel safe, and where asking for help is something that is encouraged at any age.

While we wish that the creators of 13 Reasons Why would have been more careful in how they chose to tell the story, we are thankful for the good that is coming as a result of this story being told. We’re glad people are talking about mental health and suicide. If you’ve decided the show is not for you because you don’t want to risk being triggered, we support you as you pursue your recovery. If you watched and you felt triggered, we support you as you process those feelings. If you watched it and you feel the show helped you in some way, we support you. If you’re a parent and you’re doing your best to love your son or daughter, we support you. We’re all in this together.

As i watched the final episode, in which Hannah makes the heartbreaking decision to end her life, i wished she could have known how special she was. Known that she was brilliant and beautiful and loved and deserving of love — that her whole life was ahead of her, a life very much worth living. i wished Hannah had a support system, friends she could lean on and cry with, and professional help to guide her to healing.

As folks around the world continue to debate and discuss this fictional story, we hope you will remember that your true story is truly important. The things we hoped for Hannah, we hope them now for you — that your story would be rich with characters who know and love you, who fight for you instead of fighting you, people who remind you that you’re priceless.

Life is worth living. The best is yet to come. Let’s keep going. 

Phone numbers for National Crisis lines open 24/7:

Anxiety, Depression, Suicidal Hotline: 1-877-925-5482

National Suicide Hotline: 

(800) 273-8255

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Hotline:

(800) 729-6686

National Council on Alcoholism and Drug Dependence Hopeline:

(800) 622-2255

Eating Disorders Awareness and Prevention:

(800) 931-2237

Missouri (Jackson, Johnson, Cass, Lafayette, Platte, Ray counties) Mental Health Crisis Line:

(888) 279-8188
HELP LINE:

211

HOW CELEBS LIKE KRISTEN BELL AND CHRISSY TEIGEN SAVED ME FROM MY ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Article from babble.com
There I was, age 16, hovering over the sink, wiping bile from my mouth. My eyes looked to my mother, pleading with her: Please don’t make me go.
I threw up every day like that before Driver’s Ed. Or heading off to school. Or going to a party.
I’d gag on my way out the door, my stomach tight with nerves; I’d wake up at 2 AM to find my body paralyzed and numb with an inexplicable fear.
Fast-forward nine years, and the scenes aren’t much different. I’ve sobbed alone in the dark of my apartment bathroom more times than I’d care to count — always with the shower running, hoping no one will hear me. I’ve dug my fingernails into my arms to take away the pain, telling my boyfriend, “If I have to live this way, I don’t want to anymore.”
This is what anxiety and depression look like; but if you just met me, you’d never know.
I’ve struggled with both since I was a child, and tried desperately to hide it because of all the stigma that swirled around it. But I’ve battled self-destructive feelings since Day 1 — it’s even well-documented in my family’s home movies. On one old VHS tape, 3-year-old me stares up at my uncle as he offers to pick me up and swing me around. My response? “But what if I get hurt?”
This anxiousness has followed me like a shadow for most of my life, darkening the happiest of days and sneaking up on me when I needed to be strong.
It hurt my relationships; forcing me to distance myself from friends because I simply couldn’t handle leaving the house, making my younger siblings feel like they had to treat me with kid gloves, given my parents great stress and worry, and caused my live-in boyfriend an unbelievable amount of emotional suffering.
‘THIS IS JUST THE WAY YOU ARE,’ THEY’D SAY. ‘IT’S ALL IN YOUR HEAD.’

And yet, despite all this, I stayed silent. For years. I didn’t even think to get help — that would be too embarrassing.
Instead, I tried to work things out on my own. But no amount of self-help books or journaling would do the trick; once I was triggered, there was nothing I could do but ride it out. And no one pushed me to get help.
“This is just the way you are,” they’d say.
“It’s all in your head.”
“Just forget about it and you’ll be fine.”
But I wasn’t fine. At least, not until about a year ago, when something inside me clicked.
First, it was Kristen Bell. Then, Chrissy Teigen.
Slowly but surely, more and more celebs came out of the woodwork to talk about their own mental health struggles, and suddenly, I realized I wasn’t alone in this fight.
When Gillian Anderson admitted she could barely leave the house at times, I thought, me too.
When Emma Stone opened up about her crippling panic attacks and how they immobilized her, I thought, I get it.
AFTER YEARS OF SUFFERING, ALL IT TOOK WAS ONE PHONE CALL TO CHANGE MY LIFE AROUND.
Their candor emboldened me, and sometime last year — midway through one of my own episodes — I picked myself up off the floor and committed to calling a therapist. And for the first time ever, I actually did. After years of suffering, all it took was one phone call to change my life around.
Since that day, I’ve attended monthly therapy sessions and have been prescribed a low-dose antidepressant to take daily, in addition to exercising and following a healthy diet. For the first time in my life, I can honestly say that I’m healthy and happy. All because I could finally put a face to mental illness other than my own, and finally tell myself it was okay to ask for help.
Now more than ever, celebs are stepping forward to talk about their own struggles with mental illness, in an effort to make the topic far less taboo — including, most recently, the Royal Family.
Princes William and Harry, as well as The Duchess of Cambridge, are spearheading the Heads Together #oktosay campaign, which encourages those suffering from mental illness to speak up. Just this week, Prince William shared a revealing conversation he had with Lady Gaga about her own struggles with anxiety, in a video that’s now going viral.
“It made me very nervous at first,” Lady Gaga shares, about finally speaking out. “There is a lot of shame with mental illness. You feel like something is wrong with you … You can’t help it if in the morning when you wake up you are so tired, sad, and full with anxiety and the shakes that you can barely think. It was like saying ‘this is a part of me, and that’s OK.’”
In the video, Prince William praises Gaga for her honesty, adding, “It’s time that everyone speaks up and feels very normal about mental health … we shouldn’t be ashamed of it.”
And she’s right. There isn’t just a personal sense of freedom that comes with talking about our struggles — there’s a freedom that comes when we liberate others from their own. By simply acknowledging that they aren’t alone.
Thanks to the bravery of celebs just like Lady Gaga, I finally felt that sense of acceptance and support for the first time in my life. I wasn’t “crazy” and I wasn’t the only one struggling to make it through each and every day. I can only hope that in sharing my own story, someone else out there may come to feel the same way.
Overcoming anxiety and/or depression isn’t something that happens overnight — or possibly ever. Learning how to manage mental illness is what’s key to living as normal a life as possible. But that can’t happen until you pick yourself up, embrace the support system around you, and DO something about it.
My only regret is waiting too long to seek help — but it doesn’t have to be yours.

When You Can’t Get Out of Bed Because of Your Depression

By Addie Herndon

This story was posted on TheMighty.com
It’s 7:30 a.m. and you have to be at work in a half hour; this is the fourth alarm that has gone off, and you still aren’t even close to moving your body out of your bed. So, you push snooze for the fourth time and you roll back over.
It’s 7:45 a.m. and there’s that pesky alarm again. This time you just turn it off and go right back to sleep.
It’s 11:25 a.m. You just woke up for the day and you know you’re not getting out of bed for at least another hour or two … maybe.
It’s 2:45 p.m. and you still haven’t gotten up. You have a meeting with your academic advisor in another 45 minutes, so you push yourself out of the bed that has held you hostage so many times before, and put yourself together. It takes extra long but you finally get dressed.
It’s 3:15 p.m. and you still haven’t left the house, so you have a panic attack and you end up not leaving the house. You talk to your roommate, your mom, your other roommate, but nothing seems to comfort you. You feel like a failure who is going to fail out of school and be fired for never getting out of that goddamn bed.
It’s 9:45 p.m. and you are finally hungry, so you decide to go into the kitchen and eat something.
It’s 11:25 p.m. and you are trying not to think about what a failure you feel you are, but those thoughts tend to creep up on you until they have taken over and suffocate any good thought you have.
It’s 1:56 a.m. and you are still not asleep; those pesky thoughts are of course there.
It’s 3:39 a.m. and you finally drift off to sleep, hoping that tomorrow is not going to be like today.
With love,
Addie

We want to hear your story. Become a ARB Foundation contributor send us your story’s here 

My Husband Died by Suicide, but Died From Depression

By Marlin CollingwoodMay 25, 2016

Two years ago — May 5, 2014 — started as any Monday would start at our home in the suburbs of Boston. It was a beautiful, sunny New England spring morning.  
My husband Gary decided to sleep in a little later than usual and would come into the office before noon. This wasn’t unusual at all. Since he’d been struggling with depression, mornings were always hard and often he’d wake up with me, let our dogs out and go back to bed for an hour or two.  

I showered, got dressed for the office then lay on the bed with him for a few minutes and we talked about the week ahead and a trip I was making to New Hampshire the next day. 
I gave him a kiss and a hug, we both said “I love you” and I left for the office.
While I remember some of the details of my morning, I can only guess what the next couple of hours were like for Gary.
I didn’t know it at the time, but he had a plan in place and this was the morning he was finally going to put the plan into action.
Did he write the note after I left or did he write it weeks or months earlier and save it on his desktop?  
Did he take Harry and Torre (our beloved Welsh Corgis) to the park for a walk?   
Was he anxious? Frightened? Sad? Relieved?   
I will never know the details of those hours. All I know is the outcome.
When I couldn’t reach him on his cell phone later that morning, I decided to drive home, wake him up and bring him into the office with me. Again, this wasn’t that unusual and it had happened before. Sometimes the depression was best faced in bed. I knew that and respected that reality.

When you love someone living with depression you expect bad days, hard days, really bad days and OK days. I assumed this was just another bad day.
But this day would be a really, really bad day.
As I drove up our street I could see there was a note taped to our screen door and at that moment I knew my life would never be the same.
Marlin, I’ve taken my own life.

I don’t want you to find me.

I love you.

Gary

And with that the world turned upside down.

Molly was our pastor and Gary knew I would need her by my side to face what had happened.

I called 9-1-1 as he’d instructed me and the police came to the house, they went upstairs to our bedroom and confirmed Gary was dead.

At that moment I made the decision I was not going to hide how my beloved had died. While he died by suicide he also died from depression.
You see Gary was vocal about his disease and would tell anyone who asked how he’d been fighting depression for years. He made sure they understood it was an illness just as serious, real and unwanted as cancer, a heart attack or diabetes. It was not his fault and he did everything he was told to do to fight the disease. Anyone living with depression or loving someone living with depression recognizes this list: Medications, therapy, ECT, vitamins, yoga, exercise, DBT, meditation, good sleep hygiene — the list goes on and on.
Sometimes after trying a new medication or therapy there would be a day or two of a change in his mood or outlook, but eventually he’d quietly break the news to me it wasn’t working.

Often with tears in his eyes he’d say, “Honey the blackness is back… I’m so sorry” like it was his fault the depression wasn’t lifting.   
That’s part of the problem with the disease of depression.  
For those who are suffering from it, there is always a tinge of self-blame.   
That self-blame is kind of built in to our societal views of mental illness — in the back of most of our minds there is a belief the patient suffering must somehow be responsible for their own depression.
But as someone who cared for, lived with and eventually lost someone I love to this disease, I can say without any doubt that if Gary could have simply changed his outlook, pulled himself up by his bootstraps, counted his blessings or any of the other platitudes often thrown at those suffering from depression he would have done it.
In fact he did do all of those things and more.   
But the disease, just like the worst cancer, was stronger than any medicine, any therapy or any walk in the sunshine.   
His doctor came to the funeral where he hugged me and with his voice breaking said, “I’ve never had a patient that wanted to get better more than Gary did, I’m so sorry I wasn’t able to help him get over this disease.”
We need more research money, we need much more knowledge of the brain, mental illness and how best to treat it.  
We have to start treating mental illness as the public health crisis that it is; a disease just as lethal as heart failure, cancer, opioid addiction and obesity. We need to make changes in insurance reimbursement policies for mental illness.
We have to smash the stigma of depression and place the disease exactly where it belongs; one of the most debilitating and deadly that any of us could face at any time.
Gary wasn’t able to stick around one more day to see if it might be different. But today my message to anyone living with depression is just that: “Stick around one more day. This disease tends not to be permanent, there are solutions that can work, you are not a burden to anyone and no one will be better off if you’re dead. Stick around. One more day. Then one more, and keep going. You are loved.”
If you or someone you love is struggling with depression this message is for you – from me and from my sweet husband. 
National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1-800-273-8255

They can help prevent suicide. The Lifeline provides 24/7, free and confidential support for people in distress, prevention and crisis resources for you or your loved ones, and best practices for professionals.

We Need to Talk About Depression (So Why Not Start With Mine)

By Debora Miranda
We need to talk about depression. Why not start with mine?
For two years I couldn’t find the pleasure in doing one of the things that I enjoyed the most. I lost count of the times I put a pillow behind my back and made myself comfortable with a laptop on my lap, only to shut it down soon thereafter because I could barely write a sentence. I tried to write with new and old notebooks, with fancy pens. I tried in the evenings and in the mornings. I used candles and music. I tried at home and in cafés, while travelling or in random places. I even went on a winter retreat on an island to spend four days totally dedicated to writing.
Yet nothing would come out.
Nothing.
Every time I closed my notebook or shut down my laptop, I would curl up in the fetal position and close my eyes, tears coming out with no mercy. No matter how hard I tried to wipe out my emotions, they would always find a way to escape.
Today I know I spent two years facing blank pages because I was trying to let out a soul that my depression had emptied.
My depression was like getting stuck in traffic. I was there against my will. I was running out of fresh air. Everything was blurry. My thoughts and feelings were crossing and running around, and I didn’t even know if they were mine or someone else’s.
I would face my wardrobe, unable to decide what to wear. I would spend hours searching for entertaining things to do, only to become exhausted and eventually give up. I cried for no apparent reason.
There were intense psychosomatic episodes that brought me to the doctor – even to emergency services – with palpitations and numbness that I could locate in my body but not in my mind. There were so many weekends at home because it was so much easier to stay in than to go out and pretend.
And yet I gained some clarity from those situations. I saw my sadness, my emptiness, and my apathy. I felt the distress of not being able to articulate what was going on inside me, of not being understood, of feeling ungrateful and useless. I realized how all of that was wrapped up in a shiny paper called guilt, which only made everything worse.
I saw it all: tiredness, apathy, sadness, and emptiness.
I felt it all too, especially the guilt.
Thankfully, in the absence of my writings, I spent endless hours reading. In the midst of my struggle, I was pleased to find a “me too” world.
It was a global, virtual community.
Scientific articles explained to me that all of this was depression.
Strangers convinced me that I could get through this.
And guess what? They were right. I did.
I’m writing this because I can write again, and now I want to help others. To those who are reading this from the other side, please know that you can get through this. You can get past the exhaustion and the apathy and the sadness and the emptiness. You won’t have to live with the guilt forever.
You can get through this. You will get through this.
I know because I could and I did.
I am writing again. This is my proof. This is my evidence that this isn’t the end for you.
So if you are stuck in your own soul like I once was: You can do this.
You can get to a place where everything is OK.
Debora writes on mental illness and other stigmatized health conditions in English and Portuguese on mindthehealth.org.

The Dual Diagnosis

From: dualdiagnosis.org

Everyone has bad days. Whether it’s because of problems at home, at work or in our relationships, we all experience down periods in our lives. For most people, the down periods come and go in a reasonable, ordinary fashion and can be remedied by things that make us happy. But for those who suffer from depression, the emotional low periods don’t go away so easily. Clinical depression is a serious mental disability with severe consequences for the individual and his or her loved ones. 
Depression affects millions of people – keeping them from living normal, happy lives. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that 10 percent of Americans suffer from this psychiatric disorder. The following groups have the highest risk of depression, according to data compiled by the CDC:
Substance abuse is common among people who are battling a depressive disorder. Because alcohol is a central nervous system depressant, the use of this drug tends to trigger depression symptoms like lethargy, sadness and hopelessness. However, many depressed individuals reach for drugs or alcohol as a way to lift their spirits or to numb painful thoughts. As a result, depression and substance abuse feed into each other, and one condition will often make the other worse

When an individual has both depression and an addiction, it is called a Dual Diagnosis. A Dual Diagnosis can be made up of any combination of a mental disorder (anxiety, depression, bipolar disorder) and addiction (drugs, alcohol, sex, gambling). Dual Diagnoses that include depressive disorders are among the most common forms of the problem; in fact, the Journal of Clinical Psychiatry reports that one in three adults who struggle with alcohol or drug abuse also suffers from depression
Depression is all too often a gateway into drug and alcohol use. It’s easy to see why. Those who experience feelings of depressions take alcohol and drugs in order to escape their negative emotions. But those who are clinically depressed are going to stay depressed if they do not seek treatment. And if these individuals are using drugs and alcohol on a regular basis, chances are their usage will soon turn into full-blown addiction as they continue in a vain attempt to self-medicate.
For some individuals who have depression and a substance use disorder, giving up drugs or alcohol can actually make depression worse. If you’ve been using alcohol for years to bury your depressive symptoms, you may find that your depression rises to the surface in sobriety. That’s why it’s so important to receive integrated treatment for both depression and substance abuse at the same time.

Without treating the depression that drives your addiction, or vice versa, you’re likely to go back to your addictive behaviors or to experience a return of your depressive symptoms as soon as you finish rehabilitation. In many cases, people who have depression and substance abuse drop out of conventional rehab programs because sobriety is too much to handle without the right level of therapeutic support.

If you or anyone you know is battling with depression and Substance Abuse please visit: 

www.dualdiagnosis.org or call 866-750-3936

All calls are Confidential

While The ARB Foundation believes in the power and efficacy of treatment, you are responsible for interviewing and selecting the provider or treatment. As The ARB Foundation does not provide treatment services, We cannot accept responsibility for any of the services provided by these or any other providers. 

If you have any questions please email us at: AliReneeBrownFoundation@gmail.com


Join us as we “Rise up Against Addiction” 5k walk/run sponsored by ShatterProof,  stronger than  addiction.

If your interested in joining us please click here to register.

Please go here and register to volunteer. In the comments box please state that you will be volunteering as the ARB Foundation!  

What Depression Is Like

By Aabye-Gayle D. Francis-Favilla

From TWLOHA.com

I know what depression is like. It visits me now and again — always showing up unannounced like a presumptuous friend.
Depression is like turning a corner and finding an abyss. It’s like realizing the path you were following has completely vanished.

Depression is like finding out the elevator is broken and that your meeting has been moved up to the thirty-ninth floor. It makes even the simplest tasks impossible. Taking just one step forward becomes a chore.

Depression is like trying to hold happiness in a sieve. No matter how much joy you’re given, it doesn’t persist.

Depression is a deep darkness that even the sun cannot seem to overcome. It is invisible, but not imaginary — fluid, yet cumbersome.

Depression is like a summer day everyone else can enjoy, but you’re still cold. It’s like knowing a fire is burning but never feeling warm.

Depression is like being adrift and unsure of where you’re going. It’s like finally seeing land but realizing it’s hostile territory.

Depression is an invisible chain with a key that’s just beyond your reach. It’s a weight. It’s a prison. And no attempts to escape it succeed.

Depression is like trying to scream but never making a sound. It’s like a maze that only contains dead ends. It’s feeling too lost to be found.

Depression is a season whose length and strength are unknown. But then, just as spring dethrones winter, one day you wake up to find blossoms have grown.

Comprehensive Mental Health Services, Inc.

                           (888) 279-8188

Offers 24/7 crisis services to clients and the community, and many situations can be handled over the phone, but when necessary, mobile face-to-face services immediately available and accessible.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1 (800) 273-8255

New ARB army logo

This is a call to action.  ARB army!!!

We would love if everyone who is a supporter of the ARB Foundation to share the hell out of this  new ARB logo on your social media accounts. We’re asking you to join us in our fight against depression, we are asking you to stand with us as we try to inspire millions suffering from depression.  

If you are dealing depression or with thoughts of suicide, you can speak to someone immediately here at the ARBFoundation.com for your depression you can email us at anytime. We recommend you please call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, if you’re having thoughts of suicide, please contact them at 1-800-273-8255.