The Room

Today I feel like I was trapped in a Room with no windows, or doors, in a room with no light, and it’s cold, the room feels heavy and I’m in the center of it and I’m sinking, I can’t move. Is room has gotten me, I feel like there no escape for me. All I have is the darkness, Lately I’ve been losing my self to this room where all my feelings and anxiety meet to sink me, even more, deeper into the floor, I feel the pressure, it feels like I’m draining, and there’s no life preserver in here, this room has gotta me it has turned me upside down and now I fell unbalanced, and I can’t stand it why? Is this room controlling me, why? Is this room so powerful, it has taken so much from me, and I’m lost in the dark, in a room with no windows, or door, my depression is winning, and I can’t control it?

I wrote this today, because of My depression. After being in jail for 15 hours in a cell, with no windows, no sound, with no way of speaking to the ones that I love….. I felt my anxiety, and depression raising up, and I started to doubt myself. My depression was telling my that I wasn’t good enough and that no care that I was in here lost in the system. lost in my mind and thoughts.

Supporting Someone With Depression

Supporting someone with a Mental Health Illness like Depression is one of the toughest things person could do. It’s not easy watching a person you love in so much pain. if you even experience, living with depression or taking care of someone with depression you really have no clue how depression affects your body. Depression is more than just tearfulness or feelings of sadness. It refers to a range of mood and other symptoms that are intense, long-lasting and distressing to the person. These symptoms will likely interfere with a person’s day-to-day life and relationships. loving someone with this illness is challenging because you never know how your loved one is going to react on a daily basis.

Here’s a few quotes from people who live with someone whos depressed, and how they feel

“We’ve been together for ten years now and I can’t imagine our lives without the depression. It’s a living thing. It lives and breathes ¿ but it seems you can’t kill it. Sometimes, at my lowest ebb, I ask myself not what’s wrong with him, but what’s wrong with me. Why can’t I make him happy? That’s what caring for someone with depression does to you. It gives you a sense of guilt.”

“When you live with a depressed person, it can be painfully difficult.”

“For men who have depressed partners, feeling helpless is especially common. Generally, men are fixers. When they hear of a problem, their reaction is to fix it. But depression is not so easily fixed, therefore the result is helplessness and frustration. This can complicate the helping process.”

“It is difficult to feel helpless, which is often the case when you live with a depressed individual. It may not be healthy to feel it is one’s duty to rescue a partner, and certainly not to take responsibility for his or her feelings. And this does happen often in relationships.”

The frustrating thing part about it is feeling helpless, you wonder how you can maintain, and you wonder if it’s really worth it…… The temptation is there to tell your loved one to “look on the bright side” or “snap out of it.” But would you say that to a physically injured person? Mental illness can be difficult to understand what it is like unless you’ve experienced it yourself. We live in a world where “5 Easy Steps” is touted as the solution to all problems. But the reality is that getting out of bed and going to work when you’re depressed isn’t about following a simple lifehack, summoning the right amount of willpower, or bribing yourself. Motivating catchphrases are never helpful, and will probably be met with hostility and irritability.

Don’t be discouraged. Overcoming depression is possible and probably for many people, but it’s no simple task. So what can you do for your loved one? what I’ve learned is that you have to be persisted.

Take the time to communicate to your loved one. Reassure them that you understand and that you are here for them. Let them know you don’t think they are weak, and that you know they are not choosing to feel the way they do.

Involve the person as much as you can in the decision-making process. So rather than saying, “You need to get out of the house and go outside today,” you could say, “I’d like to get outside today. Would you rather go for a walk in the park or go see a movie?” If they refuse, it’s important not to force them to do anything. Instead, provide genuine praise for the small successes and avoid sarcasm.

Loving someone with a Mental Illness takes time, and you can’t force it. Never ever forget to care of your mind, body, and other relationships when a loved one is struggling. Depressed people are often perceived as being self-centered because all of their focus and energy is caught up in dealing with the disorder. Therefore you may need to turn to other friends and family members for support and encouragement. Counseling or a support group can be an incredibly helpful resource to learn more about depression but also to learn positive coping skills for yourself as well.

Always Remember to always encourage your loved one to seek help and please check out our Resource page to get help for you or someone you know that is battling depression or throughs of suicide in your local area.

Merry Christmas

Wanted to take a moment to say on behalf of the Brown Family, and The ARB Foundation, Merry Christmas, we wish you joy, peace, and love in this Holiday season. Thank you

Also want to send out a Merry Christmas, to our soldiers, first responders & medical personal in your prayers. Be safe & enjoy your families & remember the reason for the season.

Warrior Heart & Vets with PTSD

To all of our proud man and women that serve this country! Thank you for your service, To all veterans that struggling with PTSD (Post Trumatic stress disorder)

Please check out this website: warriorsheart.com

WARRIORS HEART – PTSD, ADDICTION AND CHEMICAL DEPENDENCY TREATMENT FOR ACTIVE MILITARY, VETERANS, AND FIRST RESPONDERS

#ARBFoundation #ARBStrong #shatterproof #warriorsheart

A good portion of American Vets struggle with (PTSD) everyday

The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs estimates that PTSD afflicts: Almost 31 percent of Vietnam veterans. As many as 10 percent of Gulf War (Desert Storm) veterans. 11 percent of veterans of the war in Afghanistan.

All Veterans with PTSD have lived through a traumatic event that caused them to fear for their lives, see horrible things, and feel helpless. Strong emotions caused by the event create changes in the brain that may result in PTSD. … Yet only some will develop PTSD; the reason for this is not clear.

There are 21.8 million veterans of the U.S. armed forces as of 2014, according the Census Bureau, approximately 10 percent of whom are women. To put that in context there are 319.2 million Americans, according to the bureau.

Symptoms of PTSD

PTSD symptoms usually start soon after the traumatic event, but they may not occur until months or years later. They also may come and go over many years. If the symptoms last longer than 4 weeks, cause great distress, or interfere with work or homelife, the individual probably has PTSD. There are four types of PTSD symptoms:

Other common problems

People with PTSD may also have other problems. These include:

• Drinking or drug problems

• Feelings of hopelessness, shame, or despair

• Employment problems

• Relationship problems, including divorce and violence

• Physical symptoms

Treatment

When a Veteran has PTSD, dealing with the past can be difficult, and feelings are generally kept “bottled up”. Treatment must be provided by qualified hospice or VA staff. See PTSD Related Resources for additional information

publichealth.va.gov

.myhealth.va.gov

real-warriors

Warriors Heart

ARB Army shirts 

ARB Army

Its about that time guys!!!!!! We’re going to be selling our ARB Army t shirts.  We’ve had such positive and excellent feedback on the shirts, and their design…….  In fact we’ve been  receiving emails and inbox messages on our social media from people all over asking for them

The ARB army shirts and this foundation was established to keep Ali Renee Brown’s dream of helping those out there struggling with depression, anxiety, and addiction just like she did alive. 
(ARB Army tee’s) $20.00 

These shirts represents so much, and Ali’s memory is one.


The ARB Foundation
is proud to be apart of the solution for these issues that people around the world struggle with everyday. We are honored that we can create dialogue that helps to educate and raise awareness of these issues that plague Americans and people across the globe the deal with these everyday struggles.

A portion of the shirts proceeds will be helping to fund the local mental health and first aide programs in the Kansas City area, as well as helping to build ARB foundation into a reliable source of hope in the community. 

Did you know that 1 and 5 Americans struggle with some form of  mental illnesses? Depression is a common illness worldwide, with more than 300 million people affected. Depression is different from usual mood fluctuations and short-lived emotional responses to challenges in everyday life. Especially when long-lasting and with moderate or severe intensity, depression may become a serious health condition. It can cause the affected person to suffer greatly and function poorly at work, at school and in the family. At its worst, depression can lead to suicide. Close to 800 000 people die due to suicide every year. Suicide is the second leading cause of death in 15-29-year-olds.

if you or anybody you know that is going through any type of depression there are services in our city that can make a difference.

 Then we have our ARB shirts! 

Your Story Isn’t Over Yet tee’s ($20.00)


These are our inspirational shirts.
The ARB Foundation is all about spreading awareness through positivity while uplifting those in need to help them become their greatest version! Your depression and your anxiety doesn’t determine who you are.

(Recovering Is More Than Surviving tee’s)($20.00)


With these shirts
we want you to look at us as your source of positivity and hope when you feel like you have none. The ARB Foundation will always be here for you.


Back on January 12, 2017,
police said three men showed up to Brown’s apartment and opened fire. A couple and Ali Brown died from their injuries.  This is our only way of getting justice, by keeping her dreams of help those in need alive, and by keeping her story in the public eye. 

Please click here to show your love and support for Ali, her cause. Please include what size you want and your contact info – we will send you a PayPal link upon receiving your email.

And just like we do with Karson Krusaders shirts once you get your shirts email us at  alireneebrownfoundation@jgmail.com A photo of you wearing your ARB T-Shirt, and we will feature you on our social media accounts, and our website!

HOW CELEBS LIKE KRISTEN BELL AND CHRISSY TEIGEN SAVED ME FROM MY ANXIETY AND DEPRESSION

Article from babble.com
There I was, age 16, hovering over the sink, wiping bile from my mouth. My eyes looked to my mother, pleading with her: Please don’t make me go.
I threw up every day like that before Driver’s Ed. Or heading off to school. Or going to a party.
I’d gag on my way out the door, my stomach tight with nerves; I’d wake up at 2 AM to find my body paralyzed and numb with an inexplicable fear.
Fast-forward nine years, and the scenes aren’t much different. I’ve sobbed alone in the dark of my apartment bathroom more times than I’d care to count — always with the shower running, hoping no one will hear me. I’ve dug my fingernails into my arms to take away the pain, telling my boyfriend, “If I have to live this way, I don’t want to anymore.”
This is what anxiety and depression look like; but if you just met me, you’d never know.
I’ve struggled with both since I was a child, and tried desperately to hide it because of all the stigma that swirled around it. But I’ve battled self-destructive feelings since Day 1 — it’s even well-documented in my family’s home movies. On one old VHS tape, 3-year-old me stares up at my uncle as he offers to pick me up and swing me around. My response? “But what if I get hurt?”
This anxiousness has followed me like a shadow for most of my life, darkening the happiest of days and sneaking up on me when I needed to be strong.
It hurt my relationships; forcing me to distance myself from friends because I simply couldn’t handle leaving the house, making my younger siblings feel like they had to treat me with kid gloves, given my parents great stress and worry, and caused my live-in boyfriend an unbelievable amount of emotional suffering.
‘THIS IS JUST THE WAY YOU ARE,’ THEY’D SAY. ‘IT’S ALL IN YOUR HEAD.’

And yet, despite all this, I stayed silent. For years. I didn’t even think to get help — that would be too embarrassing.
Instead, I tried to work things out on my own. But no amount of self-help books or journaling would do the trick; once I was triggered, there was nothing I could do but ride it out. And no one pushed me to get help.
“This is just the way you are,” they’d say.
“It’s all in your head.”
“Just forget about it and you’ll be fine.”
But I wasn’t fine. At least, not until about a year ago, when something inside me clicked.
First, it was Kristen Bell. Then, Chrissy Teigen.
Slowly but surely, more and more celebs came out of the woodwork to talk about their own mental health struggles, and suddenly, I realized I wasn’t alone in this fight.
When Gillian Anderson admitted she could barely leave the house at times, I thought, me too.
When Emma Stone opened up about her crippling panic attacks and how they immobilized her, I thought, I get it.
AFTER YEARS OF SUFFERING, ALL IT TOOK WAS ONE PHONE CALL TO CHANGE MY LIFE AROUND.
Their candor emboldened me, and sometime last year — midway through one of my own episodes — I picked myself up off the floor and committed to calling a therapist. And for the first time ever, I actually did. After years of suffering, all it took was one phone call to change my life around.
Since that day, I’ve attended monthly therapy sessions and have been prescribed a low-dose antidepressant to take daily, in addition to exercising and following a healthy diet. For the first time in my life, I can honestly say that I’m healthy and happy. All because I could finally put a face to mental illness other than my own, and finally tell myself it was okay to ask for help.
Now more than ever, celebs are stepping forward to talk about their own struggles with mental illness, in an effort to make the topic far less taboo — including, most recently, the Royal Family.
Princes William and Harry, as well as The Duchess of Cambridge, are spearheading the Heads Together #oktosay campaign, which encourages those suffering from mental illness to speak up. Just this week, Prince William shared a revealing conversation he had with Lady Gaga about her own struggles with anxiety, in a video that’s now going viral.
“It made me very nervous at first,” Lady Gaga shares, about finally speaking out. “There is a lot of shame with mental illness. You feel like something is wrong with you … You can’t help it if in the morning when you wake up you are so tired, sad, and full with anxiety and the shakes that you can barely think. It was like saying ‘this is a part of me, and that’s OK.’”
In the video, Prince William praises Gaga for her honesty, adding, “It’s time that everyone speaks up and feels very normal about mental health … we shouldn’t be ashamed of it.”
And she’s right. There isn’t just a personal sense of freedom that comes with talking about our struggles — there’s a freedom that comes when we liberate others from their own. By simply acknowledging that they aren’t alone.
Thanks to the bravery of celebs just like Lady Gaga, I finally felt that sense of acceptance and support for the first time in my life. I wasn’t “crazy” and I wasn’t the only one struggling to make it through each and every day. I can only hope that in sharing my own story, someone else out there may come to feel the same way.
Overcoming anxiety and/or depression isn’t something that happens overnight — or possibly ever. Learning how to manage mental illness is what’s key to living as normal a life as possible. But that can’t happen until you pick yourself up, embrace the support system around you, and DO something about it.
My only regret is waiting too long to seek help — but it doesn’t have to be yours.

When You Can’t Get Out of Bed Because of Your Depression

By Addie Herndon

This story was posted on TheMighty.com
It’s 7:30 a.m. and you have to be at work in a half hour; this is the fourth alarm that has gone off, and you still aren’t even close to moving your body out of your bed. So, you push snooze for the fourth time and you roll back over.
It’s 7:45 a.m. and there’s that pesky alarm again. This time you just turn it off and go right back to sleep.
It’s 11:25 a.m. You just woke up for the day and you know you’re not getting out of bed for at least another hour or two … maybe.
It’s 2:45 p.m. and you still haven’t gotten up. You have a meeting with your academic advisor in another 45 minutes, so you push yourself out of the bed that has held you hostage so many times before, and put yourself together. It takes extra long but you finally get dressed.
It’s 3:15 p.m. and you still haven’t left the house, so you have a panic attack and you end up not leaving the house. You talk to your roommate, your mom, your other roommate, but nothing seems to comfort you. You feel like a failure who is going to fail out of school and be fired for never getting out of that goddamn bed.
It’s 9:45 p.m. and you are finally hungry, so you decide to go into the kitchen and eat something.
It’s 11:25 p.m. and you are trying not to think about what a failure you feel you are, but those thoughts tend to creep up on you until they have taken over and suffocate any good thought you have.
It’s 1:56 a.m. and you are still not asleep; those pesky thoughts are of course there.
It’s 3:39 a.m. and you finally drift off to sleep, hoping that tomorrow is not going to be like today.
With love,
Addie

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